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First Edition 2017
Griffith Magazine

Blurring minds and changing lives

Griffith Magazine

First Edition November 2017

Social Marketing @ Griffith wants to change behaviour for the better.

It’s a big goal, but in the last 12 months alone the team of 30 researchers have changed attitudes about alcohol, reduced food waste and investigated ways to encourage children to be more active.

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

“We work in community and do research that shows people how they can bring marketing into the mix to encourage people to engage with projects and make change,” explained Professor Sharyn Rundle-Thiele, Director of Social Marketing @ Griffith.

Blurred Minds is among their many successful programs and uses gamification to deliver alcohol education to teenagers. In 2017, the team introduced a virtual reality party for students to attend and it’s since been rolled out at schools across Queensland.

“Every client we work with, every research partner, every Griffith Business School student - we’re creating a better understanding of what we do and the impact it can have.”

“Watching kids line up at the end of lunchtime, wanting to get back into the classroom and continue with Blurred Minds – that was personally one of the most rewarding moments this year,” Professor Rundle-Thiele said.

While many people still don’t realise the value of marketing in creating social change, Professor Rundle-Thiele is hopeful that their work is starting to reach a wider audience.

“Every client we work with, every research partner, every Griffith Business School student – we’re creating a better understanding of what we do and the impact it can have.”

Nominated for a national award to help reduce food waste, Griffith’s social marketing researchers also helped devise a program showing people how to better use their leftovers to create delicious, healthy meals.

Developed in partnership with Redland City Council, Waste Not, Want Not produced outstanding results in its two-week pilot program in March.

Australians discard $5.2 billion worth of food annually and that figure is worryingly increasing.

Now more than 15,000 kids have easier access to an education

Australia’s 2016 United Nations Youth Ambassador, Chris Eigeland, is a Griffith University graduate. Remarkable.

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